Thursday, April 25, 2013

Illegal activity on the border - Tucson, Arizona boondocking

I was in the mood for geocaching, and the directions made the road sound ... meh... so I took the Tracker out.

THIS is how you spend your lawless card?

You know that sometimes, finding the actual geocache site is the least exciting part of the trip.


Forward? That's a negative. Reverse? Still no. 
 Later, Annie said "one wheel what?" I was going to call  her for a refresher on putting it into 4WD, but I had no signal. That made figuring it out myself the very best of one option.

All the rest of the challenges kept things four-down, but I did need to get out to assess my strategies a few times.




Palo verde trees are full of bees lately.

Jake is full of wags lately. This is him obeying a JAKECOME!
He seems to have no separation anxiety at all, despite the shelter's records. YAY! He just doesn't want to be left alone outside. So, today we could enjoy one of our favorite dog-unfriendly restaurants (Govinda's) for our anniversary.

Sonoran Squash? Palo gourd-o?



This is on a dirty road we walk. Some sort of a benchmark? The concrete seems too stable, round, and regular to be fill. Ideas?


We met Dixie and Will (who don't blog yet), an energetic newly-retired couple who grabbed their RV in March and high-tailed it to Tucson. Dixie has a keen interest in boondocking, and is interested in solutions for impassable roads. Dixie, this is what one landowner here does.



If you're going to park here for long, you need to pre-think your response to requests for help. A traveler may need water, food, money, and/or transportation. It will also help to know more Spanish than no hablo EspaƱol and lo siento, even though those phrases will get a "no" across, if that's what you want. So will "no."

It's important to be able to say THAT'S NOT PHOENIX, because no one wants that kind of mislead on their conscience.

Inform yourself on the legalities of aiding a person who may be in the US without documentation. Friends in the know tell me that giving water is always legal. If you choose to give food, you're on shakier ground. Some people put it on the ground and walk away from it; if someone takes your food while you're not looking, well, there's not much you can do about that. Items that you might have stolen are things like Vienna sausages, soft granola bars, fruit cups, soft fruit, or things that can be eaten by a partially-dehydrated person.


Transportation to anywhere (including a hospital) may land you in jail. If you encounter someone who is in medical distress, you can call 911. If you choose to drive them to help, understand the possible consequences.

Maybe you'll be asked if you are la migra. Or, you may be asked to call migras, if the person wants to go home.  


Some of our friends are fearful for us, knowing that we are parked where there is foot traffic. All I can say is that "illegal activities" are not all created equal. Having met a traveler hasn't changed my mind about this.

I dig that not everyone feels the same about this stuff. You dig that I won't argue with you about it.





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23 comments:

Gaelyn said...

Always a good idea to give water and food. Boondocked in Winterhaven near a wash and there was always both under a road bridge.

The Good Luck Duck said...

Interesting.

I wonder how California border law differs from Arizona's.

Rick Doyle said...

I think your blog title is bound to attract lots of readers and a lot of comments too! Illegal and Border seems to do that - good luck ducks with this blog.

I'll help you out by starting off with I don't think California's border law differs from Arizona's. However, unlike Arizona, California doesn't have a 'wacko' Governor.

TexCyn said...

I guess in some cases, you really don't know how you'd react until the situation arises. I am however, very glad that Jake is working out so very well!!

Anonymous said...

Guess rick should know wacko!
Az Girl

Grace said...

Glad Jake is doing so well. What a sweetie! Read your link on what it's like to die of thirst. Makes me re-think what I would do, that's for sure. Hope you had a really great anniversary!
Grace (in Tucson)

Nan Talley said...

Isn't it amazing that Canadians have so much to say about U.S. business.

SAM said...

Isn't it amazing that some people just don't get that we are citizens of this planet not just of a country? It is illegal in the state of Arizona to refuse someone water.....

Mary said...

That is indeed a benchmark. Specifically, it is most likely a control monument for the road. The LS means Licensed Surveyor followed by his/her number.

klbexplores said...

Food for thought as it were. I really haven't given this much thought... guess it is time. Traveling solo give me some pause. Maybe I could leave 'leftover water under bridges, behind cactus...just not a trail to my camp!

Cj Cozygirl said...

While I have no answer for border crossings, I would have to say, giving out water should not be a crime anywhere on earth. I'm sorry but I'd sure not want to be the one crossing the desert dying of thirst!

Morgan Johnson said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Morgan Johnson said...

legal or illegal, humanity is humanity and we are measured by how we treat "humanity". I could no more not give a human water, than I could deny a dog water....... or a duck!

Mary Tipton said...

Thank you for the information. I would never had about if it was legal to give someone food and water!

Anonymous said...

Hi Annie & Roxie!! We were thrilled you came to visit!! and HAPPY ANNIVERSARY!!! I take it Jake did o.k.the day you came to visit? ---Hey that's not a bad idea to help fill the road!!!! note: (must start collecting broken cement)---- We could NEVER deny any living thing some water and food if we had it. Have a GREAT DAY!! and CELEBRATE!!! Dixie & Will

Happy Trails said...

That beautiful white flower is Datura. Can be poisionous, narcotic and hallucigenic (SP?). Here is a link about it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datura

Contessa said...

Even in Mexico we have locals working in the hot sun coming up to our RV asking for water. Not only do we give them water we invite them to some sit out of the sun for a bit.

Paul and Marti Dahl said...

Quite the challenge, being where you are. I know you'll use your very best ducky common sense if those situations arise.

JO said...

Those guys are getting kinda close to your camp. I know we don't see things the same way in this but please be careful. It isn't so much the regular people crossing as it is the drug runners.

Stillhowlyns Travels said...

You've probably mentioned in past posts where you're boondocking in Tucson. This does not look familiar but very nice. Looking forward to getting back to Tucson Mt. and those beautiful blooming cacti. And Jake is most handsome! Lynda

Donna K said...

We had our driveway paved several years ago. It was in the summer and it was hot, dirty work. Even though these were paid workers, I filled a plastic tub with ice and water bottles each day. Would I do less for someone, anyone, who was struggling in the middle of the desert?

wheelingit said...

Ah, tough questions and tough answers. Don't think I could refuse water to anyone, the rest gets murky.
Nina

We Buy Houses Tucson AZ said...

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